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R4 Half Marathon

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Description

Aim: To train for and complete a half marathon. Taken from the BB Seniors Challenge Plus Pro Pack, Recreation project R-4

Resources

Taster 1
• CD Player
• Bleep test CD
• Tape measure
• Running area 15m long

Taster 2 & 3
• Stop watch
• Running clothes
• Map
• Water bottle

Christian Faith
Bible
Stop watch

Project
• Running clothes
• Trainers/running shoes
• Water bottle

Instructions

Taster 1 - Bleep Test

Aim: To attain as high a level as possible on the bleep test shuttle run exercise.

Instructions:
The Bleep Test (sometimes known as the multi-stage fitness test) involves running continuously between two points that are preferably 15 metres apart. These runs are synchronised with a CD, which plays bleeps at set intervals. As the test proceeds, the interval between each successive bleep reduces, forcing the athlete to increase velocity over the course of the test, until it is impossible to keep in sync with the recording.

The recording is typically structured into 23 levels, each of which lasts 60 seconds, Usually, the initial intervals of bleeps require a speed at the start of 8.5 kw/h, which increases by 0.5km/h with each level. The progression from one level to the next is signalled by 3 rapid bleeps. The highest level attained before failing to keep up is recorded as the score for that test.

• Stand at one end of the hall (the length of the hall will be specified on the CD but normally needs to be approximately 15m long).
• Start the CD which will provide all necessary instructions.
• You will be instructed to run up and down the hall in time with the bleeps on the CD.
• If you fail to complete three lengths in a row in the necessary time they must leave the exercise.
• Record the level that you leave the exercise.
• The exercise will last approximately 20 minutes including recovery time.

Try and improve levels over a series of weeks.

Preparation:
Buy a copy of the Bleep Test.

Tips / Advice:
A CD version of the Bleep Test can be purchased from various websites (e.g. www.amazon.co.vk). It may also be possible to download an audio file version off the internet, although there would be a charge for this.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessment:
• The Bleep Test is not a competition against peers.
• Ensure that any person carrying an injury or that has a cold does not participate in any running / exercise — they will run the risk of aggravating the injury/virus and causing long term damage.
• For any person with asthma or similar breathing difficulties, encourage them not to push themselves too far, and ensure that they have the appropriate inhaler/medication to hand if needed.
• Do not run if the weather is particularly warm — young people are much more susceptible to temperature changes than adults and will quickly become dehydrated.
• If any person picks up a sprain, they should lie on their back and have their injured ankle/foot elevated. Packs of ice should be compressed on the ankle/foot to reduce swelling.

Taster 2 - Outdoor Run Training

Aim: To plan and complete a short run


Instructions:
When you start running build up to a distance of five kilometres. If you’re not doing a round-trip then choose a turn-around point that’s no further than 21/2 kilometres away.

Think about:

• What route will you take? Ensure that the route is safe (e.g. away from major roads) and is of suitable terrain.

• What is the experience of the group? There will likely be a large range of abilities amongst the group — the aim is to complete the run rather than get an individual personal best. Ensure the most able” are at the front and back of the group, to ensure a reasonable pace is maintained and that no one is left behind.

• What do you need to do before the run?
a. Check the weather. If it’s particularly hot outside, shorten the proposed run, or postpone it for another time.
b. Drink water about 20 or 30 minutes before you start your run, and make sure there is water available to hand along the way.
c. It is very important for people of all ages to warm up the body before running or walking or doing any sports activity.
d. Wear appropriate clothing:
— Lightweight running shoes that fit well and have plenty of support.
— If it’s hot out, a hat keeps the sun off your face. In cold weather, it keeps heat in.
— Light, breathable fabrics are best.
— Thin socks that wick sweat from your feet.
— Light colours are best for visibility and reflecting the sun.
— If running in the dark, ensure that you are wearing bright, reflective clothing.
— Do not run with headsets — they will distract you from what’s going on around you, e.g. approaching cars.

• What do you need to do during the run?
a. Don’t break into a sprint as soon as you start. Begin by walking for at least three or four minutes to get your muscles warmed up. The same way, end your run with a few minutes of walking to coo! down. Abruptly starting and stopping is not good for your heart or your muscles.
b. Have fun! keep your face, shoulders and hands relaxed (don’t tense up). You should be able to keep a conversation going with your running partner the whole time. If you’re too out of breath to do this, then slow down.

• What do you need to do after the run?
a. When you’re finished, take a few minutes to stretch, especially your leg muscles. Your calves, hip flexors and hamstrings need it the most.
b. Your body lost a lot of fluid while you ran, so make sure you drink some water or juice.
c. You’ll also want to eat something within an hour of running to help replace lost energy stores. The best choices are a combination of carbohydrates (breads, cereals, rice and pasta) and protein (meats, nuts, dairy foods and beans). A turkey sandwich or a bowl of cereal would both be good after-run snacks.

Preparation:
Plan the route well in advance taking into account the size of the group. A large group should not run on pavements.

Tips / Advice
• If you’re involved in sports already, adding running to your busy schedule might be too much, Talk to your coaches to get advice. Your body can’t become healthier unless it has time to rest and repair itself between activities.

• Don’t run every day at first — two or three times a week is plenty. Again, your body needs to rest and repair, and to get used to this new activity. Just go for a walk, a swim or a bike ride on your days off. Combining activities like this is called cross training”, and it’s one of the best ways for young people to stay in shape.

• If you’re brand new to running and it seems too difficult, use interval training to work yourself up. Start by walking for five minutes, running for two minutes, walking for five and so on. As your body gets used to it, you can walk for two minutes and run for five, walk for one minute and run for seven.., whatever works best for you that day, Eventually, you’ll be able to run for longer periods without becoming exhausted.

• Running events can provide a great opportunity to fundraise for your group or a charity.

• Check with your BB Battalion/ District for details about forthcoming running/athletic events.

• BUPA coordinate a series of junior (under.17) running events across the country. Details about these can be found in their Junior Programme on .greatrun.org/events.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessment:
• Ensure that any person carrying an injury or that has a cold does not participate in any running! exercise — they will run the risk of aggravating the injury/virus and causing long term damage.
• For any person with asthma or similar breathing difficulties, encourage them not to push themselves too far, and ensure that they have the appropriate inhaler/medication to hand if needed.
• Do not run if the weather is particularly warm — young people are much more susceptible to temperature changes than adults and will quickly become dehydrated.
• If any person picks up a sprain, they should lie on their back and have their injured ankle/foot elevated. Packs of ice should be compressed on the ankle/foot to reduce swelling.

Taster 3 - 40 Minutes

Aim: To complete 5km in 40 minutes

Instructions:
Before beginning a training plan for a half marathon you should be able to run 5km in 40 minutes. Use taster 2 to build up to this level. When you think you are ready:

• Plan a 5 km route
• Time the group completing it
• Do it within 40 minutes

Remember this is a group activity so work together until the whole group can complete 5km in 40 minutes.

Preparation:
Complete Taster 2.

Tips / Advice:
• Don’t just begin with this time trial build up to it with at least one previous run.
• Completing this activity will ensure that you are ready to start training for the Half Marathon project.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessment:
• Ensure that any person carrying an injury or that has a cold does not participate in any running / exercise — they will run the risk of aggravating the injury/virus and causing long term damage.
• For any person with asthma or similar breathing difficulties, encourage them not to push themselves too far, and ensure that they have the appropriate inhaler/medication to hand if needed.
• Do not run if the weather is particularly warm — young people are much more susceptible to temperature changes than adults and will quickly become dehydrated.
• If any person picks up a sprain, they should lie on their back and have their injured ankle/foot elevated. Packs of ice should be compressed on the ankle/foot to reduce swelling.

Christian Faith - Persistence

Aim: To teach the value of never giving up.

Instructions:
A wall sit is an exercise done to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. In silence get each member of the group to place their back against a wall with their feet shoulder width apart and a little way out from the wall. Then, keeping the back against the wall, lower the hips until their knees form right angles. Time each person using a stop watch, and see who can do it for the longest. It can be very painful to hold this position for extended periods of time.

Think about:
• What do you need to be able to do this for a long time?
• ,at keeps a long distance runner going and going?
• When does a runner need persistence? e.g. when we are training, when we have failed, when we feel we might not make it, when we feel like giving up.
• Are there areas in your life that you feel like giving up on? e.g. exams, BB, God.
• How can you help yourself not to give up? e.g. be determined, be positive, remember it’s not over until you decide, tell others of your struggles, ask for help, look to change the situation for the better, believe things will get better.
• How can God help? e.g. gives us strength to cope and overcome, put supporting people around us, he is with us.

Read Philippians 3:14.
When training for a race they are many times when you can feel like just giving up. If you want to achieve not only at the highest level of professional sport, but to complete a half marathon or even an exam, persistence is essential. Jesus faced many obstacles in his life, but he never gave up. Jesus had a clear aim and found strength to keep on going from God.

Read Matthew 26:42. Jesus stuck with it even when it got hard. Jesus also taught us that he would be with us always (Matthew 28:20).

Think about:
• How do supporters encourage professional athletes or teams?
• How do they discourage?
• How can you help others not to give up? e.g. offer encouragement in practical and vocal ways, sharing our own experiences, offering support.
• Have you ever caused someone to fail?

Now get half the group to perform the wall sit exercise, this time with the encouragement of someone else. Try and get them to beat their previous times. Swap over roles. Did they do it for longer?

Reflect
• Do I help others to keep on going even when they are struggling?
• Is there one thing I can do this week to support someone else?
• Do I give up too easily?

Pray
Pray that God will help us to be a persistent and determined runner in life, and an active supporter of others.

Tips / Advice:
• During the wall sit exercise make sure that two right angles are formed by the body, one at the hips and one at the knees.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessment:
Be aware if anyone is pushing themselves too hard during the wall sit exercise. It’s not worth getting an injury.

Project - Run A Half Marathon

Aim: To successfully complete and prepare for a half marathon.

Project Description:
Running a half marathon should not be entered into lightly. A training programme needs to be followed to ensure that you complete the half marathon safety. If you plan wisely...

• You are less likely to get injured.
• You will be more motivated.
• You will maximise your performance.

Before beginning your training plan you should be able to run 5km in under 40 minutes.

Go to www.bupa.co.uk/health_information, or www.adidashaIfmarathon.co.uk/training, or similar website for training plans.

The best advice is to get organised with your running. If you know what you are doing each session and why, it will help you to keep up your training momentum and give you the confidence to adapt your programme to suit your routine.

Tips / Advice:
• Completing a half marathon is a big commitment, so make sure you are ready for it.
• 1 half marathon = 21.097494 km = 13.1 miles
• Regular half marathons around the UK & Ireland include Asics Reading Half Marathon, Adidas Silverstone Half Marathon, Joe Cox Half Marathon (Stourbridge), AIIoa Half Marathon, Broadland Half Marathon (Norwich), Hastings Half Marathon, Inverness Half Marathon, The Children’s Mutual Half Marathon (Tunbridge Wells), Sussex Beacon Half Marathon (Brighton), The Dover Mercury Half Marathon, Great East Run (Bungay), Wokingham Half Marathon (Torrington), Liversedge Half Marathon, The Vitality Reading Half Marathon (Berkshire), The Brands Hatch Half Marathon (Nr Swanley), Omagh Half Marathon, Rollin Irish Halt Marathon.
• You could use this as an opportunity to get sponsorship to raise money for a charity.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessment:
• Make sure that you have trained properly in the build up to the event.
• Drink plenty of water to keep yourself hydrated.
• Wear appropriate clothing and footwear

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