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E2 Tennis

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Description

Aim: To introduce young people to the game of tennis, Taken from the BB Company Section Discoverer Pro Pack, Recreation, Sports and Games E2

Resources

Activity 1
• Tennis Racquets
• Tennis Balls
• flip chart pad
• Marker pens

Activity 2, 3, 4 & 5
• Tennis Racquets
• Tennis Balls

Instructions

Activity 1 - the Rules

Aim: To explain the rules of tennis.

Instructions:
Ask the young people to explain the rules of tennis to you. Draw the tennis court below onto a flip chart pad to help them explain the rules. Make sure that they list the basics, but don’t worry too much if they do not list all of the following:

The Court
• Singles is played on the narrower court.
• Doubles is played on the wider court.

Score In a Game
• A standard game is scored as follows with the server’s score being called first:
— No point — "Love”
— First point — "15”
— Second point — “30"
— “Third point — “40”
— “Fourth point — ‘Game”
— Except that if each player/team has won three points, the score is “Deuce”
— A player/team needs to win two consecutive points immediately after “Deuce” to win the “Game”
— After “Deuce”, the score is “Advantage” for the player/team who wins the next point
— If that same player/team also wins the next point, that player/team wins the “Game”
— If the opposing player/team wins the next point, the score is again “Deuce”

Tie-break Game
• During a tie-break game, points are scored “Zero”, “1”, “2”, “3”, etc.
• The first player/team to win seven points wins the “Game” and “Set”, provided there is a margin of two points over the opponent(s).
• If necessary, the tie-break game shall continue until this margin is achieved.
• The player whose turn it is to serve shall serve the first point of the tie-break game,
• The following two points shall be served by the opponent(s) (in doubles, the player of the opposing team due to serve next).
• After this, each player/team shall serve alternately for two consecutive points until the end of The tiebreak game (in doubles, the rotation of service within each team shall continue in the same order as during That set).
• The player/team whose tum it was to serve first in the tie-break game shall be the receiver in the a first game of the following set.

Score In a Set
• The first player/team to win six games wins that “Set”, provided there is a margin of two games over the opponent(s).
• If the score reaches six games all, a tie-break game shall be played.
• A final set often will not be decided by a tie-break, but will continue until the two game margin is achieved.

Score In a Match
• A match can be played to the best of 3 sets or to the best of 5 sets.

The Service
• Immediately before starting the service motion, the server shall stand at rest with both feet behind (i.e. further from the net than) the base line and within the imaginary extensions of the centre mark to and the sideline.
• The server shall then release the ball by hand in any direction and hit the ball with the racquet before the ball hits the ground.
• The service motion is completed at the moment that the player’s racquet hits or misses the ball.
• When serving in a standard game. the server shall stand behind alternate halves of the court, starting from the right half of the court in every game.
• In a tie-break game, the service shall be served from behind alternate halves of the court, with the first served from the right half of the court.
• The service shall pass over the net and hit the service court diagonally opposite, before the receiver returns it.
• If the first service is a fault, the server shall serve again without delay from behind the same half of the court from which that fault was served.
• The service is a let if the ball served touches the net, strap or band, and is otherwise good; or, after touching the net, strap or band, touches the receiver or the receiver’s partner or anything they wear or carry before hitting the ground.

Doubles
• The rules for doubles are The same as singles, except the wider court is used.
• Players within a pair do not have to hit alternate shots.
• The serve rotates so that each player serves once every fourth game. For instance from Player A in Pair A, to Player B in pair B, back to Player C in Pair A and then to Player D in Pair B.
• Players can only change the order of serving and receiving at the end of a set.
• The server’s partner and the receiver’s partner may stand anywhere they like on the court during the serve, even if it obstructs play.
• Traditionally however, each player takes one side of the court.

Tips / Advice:
If a ball touches a line, it is regarded as touching The court bounded by that line.

Safety issues / Risk Assessments:
Make sure that There is adequate supervision for the number of young people, to both help them with their technique and skills whilst also watching the rest.

Activity 2 - Basic Skills

Aim: To teach the basic skills and techniques of tennis.

Instructions:
Get the young people to practise these basic skills and meet the given targets:

1.. Grip
• Shake hands with the racquet.
• As you shake hands, your wrist is positioned slightly to the right of the top part of the grip (slightly to the left for left-handers).
• Check the grips and then move onto the next skills.

2. Tennis Ball Dribble Drill
• Bounce the ball on the court, using the racquet strings instead of your hand to dribble the ball.
• After you make contact with the ball, let your racquet move up with the bounce of the ball before sending it to the court again.
• Target: 25 consecutive bounces.

3. Air Dribble Drill
• Bounce the ball a few inches into the air, using the strings to keep the ball going.
• As a variation alternate between hitting it on the front and back of the racquet.
• Target: 25 consecutive "ups”.

4. Dribble the lines Drill
• Dribble the ball around the court, trying to make the ball bounce on the lines bordering the singles backcourt.
• Slant your racquet so that you direct the ball ahead of where you are now to a point where you will be after another step.
• If you dribble it straight down while walking forward, you will run over the ball and lose control.
• Target: Two trips around the singles backcourt without losing control of the ball.

5. string Catch Drill
• Have a partner softly toss a ball to the side of your body on which you hold your racquet.
• Instead of hitting the ball, try to stop it with your racquet strings, then catch it with your other racquet hand before it hits the ground.
• Let the racquet head give a little as you “catch the ball. Make it a ‘soft” catch, not a hard one.
• Target: 7 out of 10 successful catches.

6. Bump Tennis Drill
• Stand about 5 metres from your partner and gently bump the ball back and forth to each other.
• Let it bounce in front of you as many times as necessary.
• Take a short backswing and let the racquet do the work; hit the ball as gently as you can while bumping it toward your partner.
• Target: 2 minutes of bumps.

7. Net Bump Drill
• Stand inside the service court and across the net from your partner.
• Bump the ball back and forth as many times as you can.
• Slant your racquet up a bit to clear the net.
• Target: 4 bumps (after the bounce) in a row.

8. Racquet Edge Ups and Downs Drill
• Practise bouncing the ball into the air using the racquet edge pointing upward, or dribbling the ball on the court using the edge pointing down.
• As a variation develop combinations of ups and downs, using both sides of the racquet strings and both edges of the frame.
• Target: 3 "ups” using the racquet edge, and 5 downs” using the racquet edge.

Tips / Advice:
if some young people finish the task quicker than others, then feel free to set them the next challenge.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessments:
Make sure that there is adequate supervision for the number of young people, to both help them with their technique and skills whilst also watching the rest.

Activity 3 - Basic Shots

Aim: To teach the basic shots of tennis.

Instructions:
Get the group to stand in a line with enough space for them to practise the following shots. Instruct the group on how to play them:

Forehand:
• Position yourself just inside the court’s baseline and near the centre line.
• Keep your feet at the width of your shoulders.
• Hold The racquet at about waist level directly in front of you.
• Bend your knees slightly.
• As the ball is hit toward you, turn your shoulders to the right (or left, if you’re left-handed),
• Lower the racquet head toward the playing surface.
• Pivot on your right (or left) foot. With your other foot, step forward and across your body and plant this foot pointed at a 45-degree angle toward the right (or left) net post.
• At the same time, swing the racquet backward while pulling it up from the ground.
• Stop the backswing when the head of the racquet is slightly below waist level and your arm is extended and relaxed. The racquet, and your arm, should be perpendicular to the net.
• Before the ball reaches you, pause for a moment by holding The racquet in the backswing position.
• Begin driving the racquet forward with your shoulders. Try not to allow your arm to change position and exert more pressure on the swing. Grip the racquet firmly but avoid squeezing the handle too hard.
• With the ball at waist height (and you bending or straightening your knees accordingly), continue the swing, making contact with the ball at a point slightly in front of your body.
• Follow through by driving the racquet forward so that it ends up above your shoulders, pointing up to the sky and in the direction of the ball you just hit.
• Get the young people to demonstrate it without a ball and then in pairs to practise it.

Double Handed Backhand:
• As you start to move tum your shoulders towards the ball, use your wrists and arms to lay the racquet head back.
• Keep turning until your racquet head is pointing backwards and at about waist height.
• Relax and hit through the ball with your body.
• As you get to the ball, look to load up on the left foot (right hander) and then transfer your weight forwards onto your right just before you hit.
• Don’t step across with your right foot as this will send you off balance.
• If you get the footwork right you will feel the shot start from your legs.
• Rotate the left side of your body through the ball.
• Combine this with a low-to-high swing with your arms.
• Get the young people to demonstrate it without a ball and then in pairs to practise it.

Tips / Advice:
• Always pull the racquet back as soon as the ball is approaching.
• Take little steps towards the ball to get into position rather than large ones.
• Watch the ball onto your racquet to avoid mishits.
• The backswing should come from the shoulders, not the arm.

Safety Issues / Risk Assessments:
Make sure that there is adequate supervision for the number of young people, to both help them with their technique and skills whilst also watching the rest.

Activity 4 - Advanced Shots

Aim: To teach more advanced shots.

Instructions:
Get the group to stand in a line with enough space for them to practise the following shots. Instruct the group on how to play them:

Serve:
• Stand behind the base line sideways onto the court.
• Place your front foot at an angle and your back foot parallel to the base line.
• Aim for the box diagonally opposite.
• Point the racquet forward and use your other hand to balance the throat of the racquet and hold the
• Bring the racquet back into a throwing position angling the body away from the court.
• Shift your weight onto the back foot.
• Simultaneously with the left arm prepare to release ball.
• Motion your arm upwards and kept straight power the ball.
• Move both arms together.
• As the ball reaches its highest point accelerate the racquet head towards the ball in a throwing action. Reach up and hit the ball.
• Follow through across your body.
• Get the young people to demonstrate it without a ball and then in pairs to practise it.

Forehand Volley:
• Position yourself about one metre from the net.
• Keep your feet shoulder width apart.
• Keep the racquet in front of you, with the head pointing up. The bottom of the handle should be even with your belly button.
• Lightly hold the top portion of the racquet handle with the fingers of your non-dominant hand.
• Bend your knees slightly. You should be able to feel some strain on your quadriceps muscles (in your thighs).
• Step toward the ball with your left foot (or your right foot if you’re left-handed) as the ball is hit toward you above waist level. Turn your shoulders slightly to the right (or left) until you bring the racquet back to a point even with your right (or left) shoulder. This motion should be smooth.
• Drive the racquet forward to meet the ball — use a quick punching’ motion.
• The head should be vertical and the ball should strike the face evenly.
• Make contact as the ball is about even with your right (or left) shoulder.
• Turn your racquet hand slightly so that the palm faces the ball upon contact. This turns the racquet face so that The ball hits squarely off the strings.
• Follow through slightly with your swing. The follow-through for the volley is shorter than that for the regular forehand ground stroke; the racquet should not cross the front of your body.
• Get the young people to demonstrate it without a ball and then in pairs to practise it.

Backhand Volley:
• Extend the arms out in the ready position. The non-gripping hand should support the throat of the racquet.
• Hold the racquet with the top of the head slightly below eye level — at about chin height.
• Keep the racquet out in front. Take a split-step (a quick hop in ready position) when your opponent is about to hit the ball.
• Turn your racquet, opening up the face and using the non-hitting hand for assistance.
• Use your wrists to turn the racquet out, keeping it in your peripheral field of vision.
• Step forward and across with your right foot (for right-handed players), making contact with the ball at the same time.
• Block or punch the shot, instead of swinging at the ball. . .
• While making the shot, shoot back your non-hitting hand for power, reach and balance.
• Recover as quickly as possible and move back into the ready position.
• Get the young people to demonstrate it without a ball and then in pairs to practise it. .

Tips / Advice:
• Practise volleying standing close to a wall (2-3 metres away) and keep the ball in the air. This exercise will teach you to block and punch, rather than swing at the ball.
• Players often stamp or plant their lead foot hard onto the ground as they turn toward an approaching ball. This ensures solid volleys.

Safety issues / Risk Assessments:
Make sure that there is adequate supervision for the number of young people, to both help them with their technique and skills whilst also watching the rest.

Activity 5 - A Games

Aim: To play a game of tennis.

Instructions:
Play a game of tennis using the rules taught in the first activity. Feel free to adapt the length of sets and games depending on the number of young people, courts and time you have available.

Tips / Advice:
Why not arrange a tournament?

Safety Issues / Risk Assessments:
Make sure that there is adequate supervision for the number of young people, to both help them with their technique and skills whilst also watching the rest.

For full details and diagrams see the BB Company Section Discoverer Pro Pack, Recreation, Sports and Games E2

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