OSM
Leaders Login Parents Login
Online Scout Manager - designed by scouts for scouts

Asthma & Head Injuries

Report Copyright Infringement View in OSM UK View in OSM NZ

Description

First aid instruction on dealing with asthma and head injuries

Resources

Instructions

First Aid – Asthma [15 mins]
• A long term condition that causes narrowing of the airways making it difficult to breath in and out normally.
• Symptoms: History (knowing that a person has the condition); Coughing; Wheezing; Shortness of breath; Does anyone have asthma – talk about symptoms and how it makes you feel
• Treatment for an Asthma attack: Stop any vigorous activity; Keep the casualty calm and reassure; Encourage the casualty to use their blue reliever inhaler if they have it with them; Encourage the casualty to breath slowly and deeply; Do not lie casualty down, get them to sit in a position that is comfortable; If the casualty does not improve and start to get better after 5 minutes or if the casualty is becoming exhausted, get expert medical help.

First Aid – Head Injury [15 mins]
• Can be very serious because there could be additional internal injury to the brain
• Treat any external bleed as normal, do not put any bandages around the airway.
• Concussion may occur, which is when the brain has been banged against the inside of the skull, this may result in short term loss of consciousness; dizziness; nausea; memory loss; headache. All of these symptoms should fade as the casualty recovers.
• Check the casualties level of responsiveness using AVPU: ALERT/VOICE – is the casualty alert, eyes open and responding to questions; PAIN – does the casualty respond to pain, ie eyes open or movement in response to being pinched; UNRESPONSIVE – is the casualty unresponsive or unconscious.
• If the casualty does not recover or level of responsiveness falls, get expert medical help. Continue to monitor the casualty for any worsening or developing symptoms.
• Should you see any of the following symptoms, get expert medical help immediately: different sized pupils; pupils that do not react to light; bleeding from the ears; straw coloured fluid coming from the ears or nose; Weakness or paralysis down one side of the face or body.
• Be aware of possible fractures to the skull, this may be noted by soft spongy areas, intense bruising/swelling; blood in the white of the eyes. Again expert medical help is needed immediately.
• IF IN DOUBT GET HELP TO THE CASUALTY, IT IS BETTER TO BE SAFE THAN SORRY

Tags

Badge Links


Terms of Use, Cookies & Privacy Policy | Security & Data Protection Act | About Us
OSM

Rainbow, Brownie, Guide and Senior Section leaders should visit Online Guide Manager.

© 2011, 2017 Online Youth Manager Ltd.